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Thread: This description of the meteorite that killed the dinosaurs is a bit sobering.

  1. #1

    This description of the meteorite that killed the dinosaurs is a bit sobering.

    Just in case you were entertaining any notions of human significance.

    “The meteorite was so massive that it didn’t notice any atmosphere whatsoever,” said Rebolledo. “It was travelling 20 to 40 kilometres per second, 10 kilometres – probably 14 kilometres – wide, pushing the atmosphere and building such incredible pressure that the ocean in front of it just went away.”
    These numbers are precise without usefully conveying the scale of the calamity. What they mean is that a rock larger than Mount Everest hit planet Earth travelling twenty times faster than a bullet. This is so fast that it would have traversed the distance from the cruising altitude of a 747 to the ground in 0.3 seconds. The asteroid itself was so large that, even at the moment of impact, the top of it might still have towered more than a mile above the cruising altitude of a 747. In its nearly instantaneous descent, it compressed the air below it so violently that it briefly became several times hotter than the surface of the sun.
    “The pressure of the atmosphere in front of the asteroid started excavating the crater before it even got there,” Rebolledo said. “Then, when the meteorite touched ground zero, it was totally intact. It was so massive that the atmosphere didn’t even scratch it.”
    Unlike the typical Hollywood CGi depictions of asteroid impact, where an extraterrestrial charcoal briquette gently smoulders across the sky, in the Yucutan it would have been a pleasant day one second and the world was already over by the next. As the asteroid collided with the earth, in the sky above it where there should have been air, the rock had punched a hole of outer space vacuum in the atmosphere. As the heavens rushed in to close this hole, enormous volumes of earth were expelled into orbit and beyond – all within a second or two of impact.
    “So there’s probably little bits of dinosaur bone up on the moon?” I asked.
    “Yeah, probably.”

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Burney View Post
    Just in case you were entertaining any notions of human significance.
    No one tell George Monbiot, the cúnt will try and tax the poor fúcker.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir C View Post
    No one tell George Monbiot, the cúnt will try and tax the poor fúcker.
    No, George would love it. He likes anything that kills human beings - even if it means taking everything else with it.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Burney View Post
    No, George would love it. He likes anything that kills human beings - even if it means taking everything else with it.
    Extinction Rebellion Protester...

    a protest isn't a protest until someone sprays "Frack Off" on a government building

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...mate-breakdown

    “Other clubs never came into my thoughts once I knew Arsenal wanted to sign me.”

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by IUFG View Post
    Extinction Rebellion Protester...

    a protest isn't a protest until someone sprays "Frack Off" on a government building

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...mate-breakdown

    The trouble with these chaps is that they're perpetually crying wolf and fail to realise they lose credibility as a consequence. They just come off as an old-fashioned millennial domesday cult who predict the end of the world because - deep down - that's what they actually want to happen.

  6. #6

    Dunno ... this paragraph has a rather worrying smack of truth about it.

    But the Earth’s systems are highly complex, and complex systems do not respond to pressure in linear ways. When these systems interact (because the world’s atmosphere, oceans, land surface and lifeforms do not sit placidly within the boxes that make study more convenient), their reactions to change become highly unpredictable.

    Small perturbations can ramify wildly. Tipping points are likely to remain invisible until we have passed them. We could see changes of state so abrupt and profound that no continuity can be safely assumed.
    The non-linearity and highly unpredictable nature of natural systems should even be within the grasp of an arty farty literary type like you b.

    My question to any climate change denialist is what do you actually think the net affect of a few millions extra tons of CO2 in an atmosphere will do - nothing?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Herbert Augustus Chapman View Post
    The non-linearity and highly unpredictable nature of natural systems should even be within the grasp of an arty farty literary type like you b.

    My question to any climate change denialist is what do you actually think the net affect of a few millions extra tons of CO2 in an atmosphere will do - nothing?
    I’m interested in this question as well, h, so thank God you’re here to clarify it for me. Can you just tell me how many million tons of CO2 there should be in the atmosphere? How many million tons has human activity added? Could you express this additional amount as a percentage of the ideal? What does such an additional quantity of CO2 do to the atmosphere? Ha e there been occasions in the past when ’extra’ CO2 occurred naturally in the atmosphere? If so, how does that event compare with this event in terms of percentage of the ideal? I’m keen to hear all of your expertise, please go ahead.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir C View Post
    I’m interested in this question as well, h, so thank God you’re here to clarify it for me. Can you just tell me how many million tons of CO2 there should be in the atmosphere? How many million tons has human activity added? Could you express this additional amount as a percentage of the ideal? What does such an additional quantity of CO2 do to the atmosphere? Ha e there been occasions in the past when ’extra’ CO2 occurred naturally in the atmosphere? If so, how does that event compare with this event in terms of percentage of the ideal? I’m keen to hear all of your expertise, please go ahead.
    Of course, one of the major reasons for an increase in CO2 in the atmos is that there are way too many facking humans on the Earth.

    Sort that one out, Lefties...
    “Other clubs never came into my thoughts once I knew Arsenal wanted to sign me.”

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by IUFG View Post
    Of course, one of the major reasons for an increase in CO2 in the atmos is that there are way too many facking humans on the Earth.

    Sort that one out, Lefties...
    If we could persuade naive Africans, wiley Chinamen and, well, Indians, to stop breeding like fúcking rabbits, we'd all be better off.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir C View Post
    If we could persuade naive Africans, wiley Chinamen and, well, Indians, to stop breeding like fúcking rabbits, we'd all be better off.
    Don't the Chinesers already have a 'baby limiting' law?
    “Other clubs never came into my thoughts once I knew Arsenal wanted to sign me.”

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